new style perennial meadow

Meadows blog moving forward

new style perennial meadow

This site focuses on perennials and their use in an average sized garden. The perennial meadow is a technique for bringing the benefits of the naturalistic planting trend within the confines of smaller garden spaces.

The site is new and my first priority was to share some of my ideas and experiences for designing perennial gardens with other interested gardeners. The series of posts comprising the Meadows 101 page on the site was the start. It contains the ideas and background to perennial meadows and gives some practical examples of designs and how to maintain them; a quick introductory course if you like. Moving forward there will be more of the same, but not as part of Meadows 101, with more examples and hopefully ideas from some of you as well.

Thank you all for the warm welcome my new blog has been receiving over the last couple of months. I have now reached the stage were I am looking for more reader feedback to learn what it is you need. You can expect to see postings on top perennials, new and old books I think are worth reading, new projects and timely gardening tips. I also want to encourage an exchange on the broader subject of garden design. Let’s not forget, perennial meadows can only make up a part of the total design.

The other aim for this site was to start publishing a series of good value gardening guides. Initially they are written by me, but hopefully in time other authors will decide to join in. Next week will see the launch of the first three titles from Design and Plant about perennial meadow gardening. I have already written a post about my thoughts, hopes and the possible advantages and disadvantages of electronic gardening books. What is eventually published will depend very much on what the reactions are.

By focusing on the topics individual readers need the new eBook is going to appear as a series of six titles. Next Tuesday “Introduction“, “Prairie” and “Dry SteppeĀ Perennial Meadows” will be published. These will give chapter and verse on the background to naturalistic planting and the practice of creating perennial meadows. The prairie and dry steppe books will offer detailed planting schemes. Following on, two more titles will be published to offer planting schemes for open-sunny and wet meadows. As a group these books will form a portfolio of ideas for a wide range of garden habitats and offer differing moods to create different atmospheres within the garden they are used.

Finally, book six, is all about using the methods of perennial meadow gardening to create schemes for the more shady areas of our gardens. Not all will use grasses, but the perennials they contain make sophisticated solutions possible for one of the most difficult areas found within our gardens.

These are exciting times for me as I move away from the world of traditional publishing and start to experience the reactions and aspirations of my readers in an immediate and timely manner.

Last week I opened up the opportunity for you to receive occasional newsletters by subscribing to the site. It is not my intention to resend the postings that are already on the site nor bombard subscribers with more pulp to read. Occasionally, though, there will be extra material made available that way. For example, at the moment subscribers are being sent a link to download a section from the first book in the Perennial Meadows series together with two of the detailed planting schemes that will appear in the “Prairie” and the “Dry Steppe” books. In this way they will know what will be shortly on offer and be able to take advantage of any launch discounts offered.

I hope you find this posting worthwhile and that it will encourage you to take an active role in exploring the ideas of perennial meadow gardening and the world of garden design.